PTCL Pakistan Telecommunication Company is a national company

                                                  

Whose job is to provide telephone and internet services to people
all over Pakistan? Today many companies are working in this field but PTCL’s
status is in this field. It’s like the backbone.

The company was once wholly owned by the government of
Pakistan but due to incompetence and wrong decisions of the governments, today
26% of its shares have been transferred to a private company and 12% to the
public. 

There was a strong protest from the people because giving such
institutions to the private sector was an abuse of the people. 

Private
companies do business for the benefit of the people. They move forward by
looking at the revenue, not the need. Therefore, due to strong protests, the
privatization of this institution could not go beyond a certain limit 62% of
the shares of this company are still owned by the government of Pakistan, so in
practice, it is still a state-owned company.

The invention of the telephone is credited to Alexander
Graham Bell, who built the first telephone in 1876. 
 

The Calcutta Exchange was renamed the
Central Exchange and was housed in the Public Works Department building. There
were a total of 93 lines in this exchange. 

This exchange worked through the
operator and the operator would connect to the other line at the request of the
owner of one line. 

Phone numbers came much later. The first automatic phone was
installed in 1914 in Shimla. At the time of the partition, there were a total of
about 82,000 phones in India and Pakistan. Of these, just over 12,000 (12,346)
calls came from Pakistan.

This department was initially attached to the
Department of Posts and Wires. Thus the telephone became part of the Pakistan
Postal and Telegraph Department (Telephone and Telegraph Department) which came
into existence in 1949. 

In 1962, it was renamed Pakistan Telecommunication
and became an independent corporation. At present, there are about 2,000
exchanges operating across Pakistan with buildings worth trillions of rupees,
and the company is providing landline phones, internet, and telecommunication
infrastructure across Pakistan.

A mobile phone company called Ufone is also
part of it. Among other mobile service providers, Jazz tops the list with 70
million customers, followed by Telenor with 50 million and Zong with 40
million. PTCL is the fourth and last company with 20 million customers, which
is unfortunate. 

Despite being a basic and extensive telecommunication
infrastructure, PTCL is unable to provide internet in most parts of Pakistan. 

The PTCL relies heavily on the landline, but in today’s situation, it is a
sinking ship. Landlines around the world are running out. The UK recently
announced that it will end its traditional landline by 2025, as new digital
reforms will allow all homes and businesses to have access to the Internet for
phone calls.

In the next five years, PTCL’s landline in Pakistan will
naturally run out. But unfortunately, institutions like our PTCL are not ready
to deal with the situation. Of course, its internet is excellent, but its staff
performance and behavior are in no way compatible with modern style and
principles.

I have personally been a victim of this bad style and poor
performance. I have PTCL internet. It went smoothly for many months. Six or
seven months ago, the line broke down. 

Despite two and a half months of trying,
it was not correct. There was some difficulty in that, but even if those
difficulties were removed, the line could not be straightened out. 

The bill,
however, is constantly coming. For the first two or three months, I paid with
hope, but now I am not paying. 

Nowhere in the world does a company not provide
you with services but insist on a receipt. But PTCL does it and is not willing to
admit a mistake. My internet has been down for the last six or seven months.
PTCL also has the record but due to their indifference, it seems that there is
no other solution now except court proceedings.

Many of the world’s best cars failed in some areas because their
after-sales service failed. PTCL also fails despite having an excellent structure
because their after-service is ineffective. 

Its staff is not cooperative, it
does not care about the people, they work on their own. Despite the involvement
of the private sector, PTCL seems to be a purely governmental entity in terms
of behavior. Institutions and their employees do.

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